[Guest Review] Everlasting by Angie Frazier

Everlasting

by Angie Frazier

Hardcover, 336 pages
Published: June 1st, 2010
Publisher: Scholastic Press
Sailing aboard her father’s trade ship is all seventeen-year-old Camille Rowen has ever wanted. But as a girl of society in 1855 San Francisco, her future is set: marry a man she doesn’t love, or condemn herself and her father to poverty.

On her final voyage before the wedding, the stormy arms of the Tasman Sea claim her father, and a terrible family secret is revealed. A secret intertwined with a fabled map, the mother Camille has long believed dead, and an ancient stone that wields a dangerous—and alluring—magic.

The only person Camille can depend on is Oscar, a handsome young sailor whom she is undeniably drawn to. Torn between trusting her instincts and keeping her promises to her father, Camille embarks on a perilous quest into the Australian wilderness to find the enchanted stone. As she and Oscar elude murderous bushrangers and unravel Camille’s father’s lies, they come closer to making the ultimate decision of who—and what—matters most.

Beautifully written and feverishly paced, Everlasting is an unforgettable journey of passion, secrecy, and adventure.

-Goodreads

Her prosperous future, destroyed
Her father’s betrayal exposed.
Her heart’s choice divided.
An ancient magic, summoned.
This is the story of Camille Rowen, back in the days when marriages were arranged; women were betrothed, all in the name of a secured future and society stature. It probably wouldn’t be so bad. After all, Randall Jackson is a good catch. Rich, kind and handsome—her father’s business partner is everything a girl her age could want for a husband. If only she wasn’t so hung up on Oscar Kildare, her father’s first mate who shares her passion for sea and voyage.

On her last voyage before she gets married, everything she’d ever known about her life turned out to be a big pile of farce. A letter surfaced containing her mother’s whereabouts. She apparently didn’t die during childbirth. But before she could ask her father more questions, or before she could unload all the hurt and feelings of betrayal, her father died when she whispered a word that unleashes either a curse or a premonition of danger. With the help of Oscar and a conman named Ira, the chase was on to get to the stones of Umandu before the evil McGreenery gets his hands on the stones, using them to his less than pure purpose.

Everlasting is misleading. When I hear that word, I’d naturally assume I was going to read about promises of forever and never ending love. Instead, I ended up reading about Indiana Jones and the Mummy series, of treasure hunting and big ass spiders, of holes in the ground that lead to God-knows-where. I read about two-legged wolves taller than Yao Ming, with the girth of a bear and possess human features. There’s romance, for sure. But maybe the title had nothing at all to do with that. It’s really about the Umandu stones that can bring a dead person back to life. Can this stone bring eternal life? I don’t really know. Maybe the next book will tell us.

I loved the writing. Historical fiction can be boring. This one held my attention from page one to the last. I ran late this morning because I couldn’t bear not to finish it.

The characters held their own. I didn’t get annoyed when Camille was doing pros and cons of being with Oscar or Randall. It was easier to understand her reasons for doing the right thing—and was even more convincing when she changed her mind. Oscar Kildare is your run of the mill hero. Handsome and rough, whose love for Camille cost him his life. Ira was a funny and loveable sidekick.

All in all I enjoyed this book. It gave me a break from all the YA paranormal that I’ve been reading lately.

I hope to eventually get to the second book as soon as possible.

Ratings:
 PhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucket.5
Review by:
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